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First Time PC Build - Several Questions
05-20-2014, 05:23 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-24-2014, 09:13 AM by andycruce.)
#1
First Time PC Build - Several Questions
I am considering building a high end computer to replace a very old Dell that I have had for some time. I want something that will last me for a while and have the power to do most anything I desire. I also like the idea of building the computer myself for the experience and having something I can upgrade as technology evolves. The cost for the system is in the $2,500 range based on new egg prices. Here are the parts.

Intel i7-4930 3.4Ghz 130 W
AsRock Extreme 6 LGA 2011 X79 SATA6Gb/s USB 3.0 8XDIMM
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 32GB(4x8GB) 240 pin DDR2 SDRAM 1600
ZOTAC or GIGABYTE GTX 770 4GB
Samsung 840 Pro Series MZ-7PD51BW 2.5 512GB SATA II MLC SSC
ASUS SATA 24X DVD Burner
FSP AURUM Gold 850W ATX12V/EPS12V Modular PS
Cooler Master HAF X - High Air Flor Tower
Zalman CNPS20LQQ Liquid CPU Cooler
8 channel sound card: Integrated on mother board
Integrated Ethernet RJ-45 10/100/1000 Mbsp
Two Seagate Barracuda 1TB in Radi 1

To the best of my knowledge all these parts are compatible and fit reasonably together. I chose the CoolerMaster HAF-X because of it's cooling capability and its size which should make assembly easier and leave room for future expansion. Since heat is the nemesis of electronics I choose the Zalman Liquid CPU cooler because I think it will be more effective and quieter than a fan only based CPU cooler. I over speced the power supply to provide additional room for future expansion. My impression is that the heat generated by the power supply is proportional to the power being drawn so there is little penalty for overspecing this item.

There are three issues that bother me. First is reliability. Commercial grade computers run forever with few problems. Is this configuration likely to be as reliable. As most people I usually just leave the computer running when I am not using it. Is this the type of system that will provide long term reliability?

Another issue is noise. The CoolerMaster case has a plethora of fans. I don't want this computer to be something that sounds like a vacuum cleaner running. Can someone give me an ideal of how much noise such a system will generate?

Finally, I have never built a computer before. Is this something I should be able to tackle with a reasonable chance of success? In reading some of the posts there are a number of issues that don't come up on a commercial computer mostly related to monitoring temperatures on the CPU and GPU and modulating fan speeds to control temperatures. I hope that information on how to do this is included with the hardware. Is this correct?

Is there anything else I am missing?
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05-26-2014, 03:33 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-26-2014, 03:38 AM by sasikanth8.)
#2
Re: First Time PC Build - Several Questions
The one you are building will be better than the commercial pre built computers.

It seems like you are worried about the noise and heat. Buy a fan controller and adjust it according to your wish.

Afaik Water coolers are noisy than air cooler's but it is upto you to decide. There is no need to monitor CPU/GPU temperatures unless you are overclocking.
There are articles on this forum on how to build a computer etc please go through them.


Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2
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05-27-2014, 12:48 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-27-2014, 12:54 PM by Rapajez.)
#3
RE: First Time PC Build - Several Questions
Will this be used primarily for gaming? If so, what resolution is your monitor(s), and what games do you, will you be playing? I ask, because this build is heavily skewed toward the CPU, which is fine if you encode videos for a living, but otherwise, you should general spend about half as much on the CPU as the GPU. A better alternative may be a i5 4670k, Haswell, a Z87 mobo, and a GTX 780 Ti or an R9 290X. Still might be overkill if you're gaming on a 1080p monitor though.

I'd take a look at the latest Mainstream Gaming PC article.

Also, if you want a silent case, the HAF X may not be the best choice. Antec, Corsair and ThermelTake have some quieter models, even with sound-damping inside. The Zalman cooler is also pretty loud. Water coolers still need to be connected to a loud, air-cooled radiator. Smile Most only get you 1 or 2 degrees C cooler than a good air-cooler, and they only cool the CPU itself, while the surround parts can overheat. The Noctua NH-D14 is a very quite and easy to install air cooler. Corsair and NXTX have some quieter water coolers as well.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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05-27-2014, 03:13 PM,
#4
RE: First Time PC Build - Several Questions
Quick update: "Z97" motherboards are rolling out, which support the current 4th "Haswell" CPUs, and will also support the new 5th gen "Devil's Canyon" CPUs out later this year. If the prices are about the same, might as well get one with the option to upgrade.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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05-28-2014, 05:05 PM,
#5
RE: First Time PC Build - Several Questions
(05-27-2014, 03:13 PM)Rapajez Wrote: Quick update: "Z97" motherboards are rolling out, which support the current 4th "Haswell" CPUs, and will also support the new 5th gen "Devil's Canyon" CPUs out later this year. If the prices are about the same, might as well get one with the option to upgrade.

Thank you for the information. I'm not sure at this time what games I might be playing - just wanted something that could handle anything I threw at it.

After reading your suggestions and looking at some online experiences I made some changes. I upped the GPU to a GTX780 and changed the case to a Fractal Design Define R4. The R4 seems to have more internal sound damping than many cases and seems to supply sufficient cooling with just two 140mm fans installed. Also has the capacity to add a number of other fans if required.

I looked at a video on the Corsair H90 Water/Liquid CPU cooler and this seems like a good choice for the system. The 140mm radiator fan can be substituted for the one supplied with the case. Also decided to just go with a 512GB SSD and a single 2TB Seagate drive. Nothing I do requires a RAID.

One thing I need to look into is partitioning the SSD. Seems like people suggest setting up one partition for the OS and a second for the installed programs so if you have to reload the OS you don't lose all the applications. I assume the 64MB cache in the Seagate is sufficient and you don't need additional cache in the SSD.

I did look and couldn't find any Z97 motherboards for 2011 configuration processors.

Thanks again for the help,

Andy Cruce
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06-09-2014, 03:18 PM, (This post was last modified: 06-11-2014, 05:13 PM by Rapajez.)
#6
RE: First Time PC Build - Several Questions
May be too late at this point, but to follow up:

The Z97 mobo is only for the LGA1150 platform. Unless you're running multiple video cards, or running a crazy RAID setup, I recommend Z97 and a LGA1150 processor. For instance, with an $300 i7-4770, you'll save $300 on the CPU, and maybe $100 on the mobo. You could probably get away with a $200 i5-4670, but you probably want to stick with a i7 on your budget. All that saved money can go toward a better GPU, monitor, sound card, mechanical keyboard, or just be saved. The Z97 mobo will also allow you to upgrade to the 5th gen "Devils Canyon" CPUs releasing late this year.

The resolution of your monitor is also very important, as this build may be overkill for a 1080p display. This may be a gross oversimplification, but a $1000 PC may max out most games at 1080p, just as well as well as a $3000 PC. Now if you're talking 2k, 4k, or a 3+ Surround monitor setup, that's another story. Let us know.

The cache on the HDD is fine. No need to worry much about HDD speed, since all the applications will be on the SSD. Nothing wrong with partitioning the SSD. You simply set up partitions during the Windows Installation process. Full, regular backups can accomplish the same goal though, and should be performed on every PC anyway.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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