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Overclocking temps too high?
07-24-2012, 09:48 PM,
#11
RE: Overclocking temps too high?
I read that I should be able to overclock to 4.2GHz without making ANY other adjustments so I decided to test that out and post my results. This ran under "spec voltage" of 1.128v which was at 1.152v during Prime95.

The image below shows results after running Prime95 (Small FTTs) for about 5 hours. No errors showed and I'm comfortable this is stable as it's only at 4.2GHz and should not be problematic under normal conditions. I may stay at 4.2GHz for a bit but my next step would be to attempt 4.3GHz using this same method. If 4.3GHz gives me problems, I would then use fixed voltage at ~1.2v and test again. Once stable, I'd test 4.4GHz and again, finally, to 4.5GHz. In torture testing, I'd like my temps to be in the low 70s with a max of 75C. For fixed voltage I'm thinking of playing around in the 1.1v - 1.28v range making adjustments at ~0.0125v at a time.

I think this sounds good in theory but I'll need to read up more on "vdroop", "LLC" and "voltage offsets" as I may need to play with them from what I've read.

Anyway, feel free to comment and share your experiences.

[Image: 7640960614_614435fdbb_b.jpg]
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570k Ivy Bridge CPU cooler: NZXT Havik 140 Mobo: Biostar TZ77XE3 LGA 1155 Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Full Tower RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB SSD PSU: Rosewill Capstone Series 650W 80+ Gold Audio: Asus Xonar DG 5.1 sound card Screen: Asus VH238H 23" 1080p HDMI LED monitor Keyboard: CM Storm Quick Fire Rapid Cherry MX Brown
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07-25-2012, 10:37 AM, (This post was last modified: 07-25-2012, 10:39 AM by MathieuB.)
#12
RE: Overclocking temps too high?
Actually no. Your next step would be to find the lowest voltage at which your overclock is stable. Once you found that, you can slowly increase frequency and as slowly as possible, increase voltage if necessary for stability.

Heat is your enemy and to be able to overclock Ivy Bridge as far as possible, you want to keep voltage as low as possible, in order to keep heat as low as possible.

Why keep heat as low as possible? Well, first of all, to keep your CPU safe of course. More importantly in this case: To improve your overclock. Higher temperatures can result in instability.

Also 4-5 hours of testing is fine to see quickly if your PC is stable for overclocking, but once you reach your final setting, test for 24 hours to be fully confident that your overclock is actually stable. I've seen/heard of many errors at 8, 12, 18+ hours of testing.
Laptop: MSI GS30 Shadow-045 Dimensions: 12.6" x 8.9" x 0.8" 2.65lbs CPU: Intel Core i7-4870HQ Quad-Core + Hyper-Threading OC 2.5-3.9GHz RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz Video Card: Intel Iris Pro 5200 Storage: 2x128GB SDD RAID0 Audio: ASUS Xonar U3 USB Sound Card + Audio-Technica ATH-M50 headphones Screen: 13.3" - 1920 x 1080 IPS + 27" Dell P2715Q IPS 3840 x 2160 Keyboard: Filco Majestouch MX Cherry Blue Mouse: Logitech MX518
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07-25-2012, 12:19 PM,
#13
RE: Overclocking temps too high?
That's right, that's right - find that lowest stable voltage first. Thanks for the reminder and steering me in the right direction....again, Mathieu!

I'll post more results when I have time for more testing!
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570k Ivy Bridge CPU cooler: NZXT Havik 140 Mobo: Biostar TZ77XE3 LGA 1155 Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Full Tower RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB SSD PSU: Rosewill Capstone Series 650W 80+ Gold Audio: Asus Xonar DG 5.1 sound card Screen: Asus VH238H 23" 1080p HDMI LED monitor Keyboard: CM Storm Quick Fire Rapid Cherry MX Brown
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