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High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
07-23-2014, 03:12 PM,
#21
RE: High-end gaming PC, tier 12 (With pics)
I'd just try the suggestions above, and turn down the AA if it gets you to 60 FPS. It seems too soon to lose a pair of 680's. Smile

Unless you're rich or something. Then just grab a pair of R9 295x2's.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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08-01-2014, 01:58 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-01-2014, 01:59 PM by Mr. Man.)
#22
RE: High-end gaming PC, tier 12 (With pics)
(07-22-2014, 10:58 AM)Rapajez Wrote: What's the resolution of your monitor again? Even for those games, your FPS seem a little low. I'm assuming you've already got the latest NVIDIA drivers?

I run all of my games in 1920*1080.

Quote:Start by turning down the AA down in the latest games. That will make a big difference.

I always try to max out my games to see what happens and the majority of them run very well (100+ FPS steady) with no hitch except the ones I said a while ago.

Quote:Are you current 680's overclocked? I'm not sure that's the best option, if you already have 2 hot cards pumping air into the same case; however, if you're cooling is sufficient, you can easily get an extra 10-20% out of most cards. Check out MSI Afterburner and some of the 600-series overclocking guides.

My cards run at stock clock, just with heightened voltages. I am in the midst of redesigning my layout for the case to get better airflow. I will post pictures soon!

Quote:If none of those do it...you're pretty much left with upgrading to a newer pair of Video Cards. I would think 680's in SLI would be enough for anything but 4k for a few more years though.

Some of the games like Arma 3 and COH2 don't support/have SLI profiles. When I force SLI rendering on them the game starts stuttering.
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08-01-2014, 02:01 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-01-2014, 02:02 PM by Rapajez.)
#23
RE: High-end gaming PC, tier 12 (With pics)
Looks like we're both online at the same time.

Assuming that's a yes to the latest NVIDIA drivers? I'd try a clean-driver-install, just for kicks, even if you are at the latest.

Why heighten the voltages if you're running at stock speeds, or do they just come that way factory? Just curious.

For the games that don't support SLI, did you try forcing "Single GPU Performance" mode in the NVIDIA settings (per application.)
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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08-01-2014, 02:18 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-01-2014, 02:25 PM by Mr. Man.)
#24
Photo  RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
(08-01-2014, 02:01 PM)Rapajez Wrote: Looks like we're both online at the same time.

Assuming that's a yes to the latest NVIDIA drivers? I'd try a clean-driver-install, just for kicks, even if you are at the latest.

I do that all the time when a new WHQL or beta driver is released and then test with Heaven benchmarking software.

Quote:Why heighten the voltages if you're running at stock speeds, or do they just come that way factory? Just curious.

I started getting these odd hard-freezes while playing BFBC2 that required me to hit the restart button on the case to resolve. I noticed that the game ran more stable after having done so. I'll try reverting down to factory voltage to see if that has changed.

Quote:For the games that don't support SLI, did you try forcing "Single GPU Performance" mode in the NVIDIA settings (per application.)
Yes, and that's when the stuttering kicked in for games that don't natively support SLI.

Here are a few pictures of me stripping the system down for regular cleaning and 6-month thermal replacement:

The CPU cooler:
[Image: Bwx7dEO.jpg]

The 2x 680s (beautiful babies):
Apparently I had forgotten to take the protective film off of the EVGA logo on the fan and had left them there for around 1 year...
[Image: 878mckK.jpg]

Bigger shot of the case encompassing the board too:
[Image: B070OSk.jpg]

The board:
[Image: CAWFdNJ.jpg]

The CPU after heatsink removal:
Note the lack of paste near the middle. I think the heat slowly dissipated all of the paste towards the outer area of the CPU housing. Very bad.
[Image: HxD3AtI.jpg]

The CPU heatsink contact:
[Image: phS789B.jpg]

I'll create a graph detailing the Heaven benchmarks for all WHQL and beta Nvidia drivers when I get home later tonight.
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08-04-2014, 11:23 AM,
#25
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
Nice, sounds like you know what you're doing. I guess it's up to the game developers now. Write them a strongly-worded email?

"Yes, and that's when the stuttering kicked in for games that don't natively support SLI."

That sounds like the opposite of what I was trying to suggest. Setting "Single GPU performance" should force those applications to NOT use SLI.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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08-04-2014, 10:50 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-05-2014, 12:34 PM by Mr. Man.)
#26
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
Here's the Heaven 3.x/4.0 benchmarks I've aggregated ever since I started tracking around ~2 years ago? Everything's set to high with 3D stereoscope off and resolution set at 1920*1080.

[Image: GzoIp50.png]

Data's pretty easy to interpret. It looks as if overtime Nvidia improved performance on average, though 2nd pass generally nets higher FPS than 1st pass in the FPS category.

A new set of data for CPU overclocking including voltage and temperature will go up soon. However, I am currently experiencing an interesting issue where CPU temperature's staying at around 90C until I lower it to ~3.8Ghz...
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08-07-2014, 04:44 PM,
#27
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
Yikes, maybe CPU overheating then throttling was your issue all along?

What kind of cooler is that?
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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08-10-2014, 03:40 PM,
#28
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
(08-07-2014, 04:44 PM)Rapajez Wrote: Yikes, maybe CPU overheating then throttling was your issue all along?

What kind of cooler is that?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6835709001

It's quite odd considering my room is never hot and there aren't any obstructions near the CPU housing.
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08-11-2014, 09:11 AM,
#29
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
(08-10-2014, 03:40 PM)Mr. Man Wrote:
(08-07-2014, 04:44 PM)Rapajez Wrote: Yikes, maybe CPU overheating then throttling was your issue all along?

What kind of cooler is that?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6835709001

It's quite odd considering my room is never hot and there aren't any obstructions near the CPU housing.

sounds like you might need to lower your o/c voltages a bit. voltage causes higher temps not clock speed.
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08-11-2014, 03:20 PM,
#30
RE: High-end PC (tier 12) - 2012 build
(08-11-2014, 09:11 AM)PwnBroker Wrote: sounds like you might need to lower your o/c voltages a bit. voltage causes higher temps not clock speed.

What's even more interesting is that THAT's exactly what I did. I lowered the voltages to stock and started clocking from there and was able to get to around 3.9Ghz without any other adjustments while passing Prime95 tests.

However, the temperatures remain abnormally high.
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