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How to Overclock
06-20-2012, 04:06 PM, (This post was last modified: 11-12-2012, 07:08 AM by ricky07652.)
#1
How to Overclock
EDIT: How to overclock RAM and video card at the bottom of the page!
Nvidia 600 series cards cannot overclock! You must get an MSI Power Edition!
There have been a lot of questions on how to overclock so I will explain it to you in plain english. Before we start MAKE SURE YOU ARE NOT USING THE STOCK HEATSINK THAT CAME WITH THE COMPUTER OR THE CPU. You will overheat it. Speaking of overheating, you don't want your temps to go past 80-85°C.
A CPU's clock speed is made up for the FSB and the multiplier. To overclock you increase either one of those. Download something called Prime95 here:http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft/
For LGA 775:
Go into the BIOS, change your settings to Advanced, and go into the CPU section. You will see a box named either BCLK or FSB. For Celerons and Pentiums, increase by 5-10 MHz at a time. For Core 2 Solo/Duo/Quad/Extremes, increase 20-25 at a time. Then save the changes and reboot. Open Prime95, and Check the box that says "For stress testing purposes". Go into the Options tab, and select Torture Test. The name might sound a bit scary, but it's fine. Select small FFT's and click Ok. Leave your computer running for 24-48 hours nonstop. If there are errors, such as the tray icon turning red, set your voltage up or back off. For LGA 775 voltages you increase 0.1 at a time. When you increase, reboot, test again. If all clear, go back into the BIOS and raise the BCLK. Then save changes and stress test again. Don't go past 1.4-1.45v. When you get to 1.4 and can't increase and not get an error, that is your maximum.
For LGA 775 OEMs:
If you bought your computer from Dell/Hp/ASUS/Lenovo or any manufacturer, your motherboard will most likely not support overclocking. So you use something called the BSEL mod.
Tools you need:
A conductive ink pen or copper tape
Patience
Here is how you do it. They explain it better than me.
http://www.overclock.net/t/341123/intel-...-mod-guide

For LGA 1156 and 1366:

For the P55 and X58 chipsets you now overclock by increasing the multiplier. So you now go into your CPU section and increase the multiplier. Increase 1 at a time. Save. Reboot. Test. Clear? Increase. Not clear? Increase voltage. Save. Reboot. For LGA 1156 and 1366 you still increase the voltage by 0.1. Open Prime95, and Check the box that says "For stress testing purposes". Go into the Options tab, and select Torture Test. The name might sound a bit scary, but it's fine. Select small FFT's and click Ok. Leave your computer running for 24-48 hours nonstop. If there are errors, such as the tray icon turning red, set your voltage up or back off. Don't go past 1.4v.

For Sandy Bridge LGA 1155:
For the P67 and Z68 chipsets you now too overclock by increasing the multiplier. Follow the above steps but only increase the voltage by 0.5. The new voltage limit is 1.35-1.4. If you are planning to run your computer 24/7, have your clock speed at the maximum of 1.35v, then change the voltage to 1.4.

For Ivy Bridge LGA 1155:
You may have heard that Ivy Bridge has a small problem with heat dissipation. Does it really impact performance that much? No. The problem is that the die shrink centers the heat at the center of the CPU. So heat dissipation will not be as spread out as before.Ivy Bridge is also more sensitive to voltage change. The new limit for voltage is now 1.28-1.35. At this point almost all the motherboards you buy now support UEFI BIOS, which is like a visual BIOS with support for a 3-button mouse.
Go to the CPU or Overclocking tab, and increase the multiplier by one. Save, reboot and test. Rinse, clean, repeat.
Also another note: You will need a beefier CPU cooler this time to achieve same clock speeds as you did with Sandy Bridge.

For Sandy Bridge-E(LGA 2011):
This time the voltage limit is 1.45-1.5v. This socket is HUGE. You will also find it harder to overclock this beast because it has more surface area for the cooler to dissipate which will result in higher temperatures. You still increase the multiplier by 1, except now you can increase the voltage by 0.1 at a time.

Video card overclocking:
Please be cautious when overclocking with video cards. GPUs are not the same as CPUs. They are much more sensitive and prone to faliure if you overclock the snot out of them.
Really, the procedure is the same. For overclocking software I suggest MSI Afterburner: http://event.msi.com/vga/afterburner/download.htm
When you open it, You will see an overlay of graphs and 5 adjustable silders(4 for AMD) They will be labeled with Shader(Nvidia only), Core, and Memory. The core clock is the GPU clock and the one that really matters in terms of performance. Then at the top there will be a fan controller for you video card and a voltage setting. You should increase the core clock by 10-20 MHz, then save your settings and open up 3DMark11:http://www.3dmark.com/3dmark11/
Click the Graphics Test 1 and let it do its work. Then do tests 2, 3, and 4. Look for "artifacts"(tiny spots of white, discoloration, or something you think shouldn't be there. If it already appears at only 10-20 MHz increase, your GPU isn't really suited for overclocking. Also immediately after that open up MSI Afterburner and check your temperatures. MAKE SURE THEY DO NOT GO ABOVE 90°C. Sorry, but I had to stress that in all caps to emphasize the fact that heat is dangerous. If you're scared of heat, you're not scared enough.
So if they go above 90°C, back off on your overclock or bump up the voltage by 0.125v. Test again. Stable? Increase core clock. Rinse and repeat.
When your temperature goes about 85°C, stop. Then adjust the memory clock by 40-50 MHz at a time, without increasing voltage. Do the tests again and look carefully. when your temps again gets past 90°, lower it back until you see no artifacts or your temperatures are stable and under 90°.
If you have a AMD card or a Nvidia 600 series, you are done. If you have a Nvidia 500 series or less, You are not done yet. You have to adjust the shader clock. Without getting into too much detail, the core clock is the CPU of the video card. The memory clock is the RAM of the video card. The shader controls the thoroughput of the data coming from the core into actual pixel RGB commands, and sending it though the cable into your monitor, and the monitor decodes it, which is measured in milliseconds. I recommend increasing by 10-20 MHz at a time but some have gone more. I don't recommend it because sometimes you might get a naughty not-so-great at overclocking card and you might kill it by increasing too much.
When you reach 90°C, decrease the clock by one notch, and you are done.

I hoped this helped!
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06-20-2012, 04:41 PM, (This post was last modified: 06-20-2012, 04:43 PM by Pineappl.)
#2
RE: How to Overclock
Do you have any knowledge or experience with different settings within the BIOS to change or enable/disable? I know these can make a big difference in what you're able to achieve, such as these:

Internal PLL Overvoltage
Spread Spectrum
Limit CPUID Maximum
Power Technology
C1E Support
OverSpeed Protection
Execute Disable Bit
Intel Virtualization Tech

One toublesome thing I ran into when doing research on Overclocking is the wording of some of these settings differ from motherboard to motherboard so it was hard to find a guide for my specific mobo.

What's the difference between doing the 'small FFT's' test vs the Blend test. I've only heard of doing Blend for Prime OC stress testing.
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06-20-2012, 07:03 PM,
#3
RE: How to Overclock
Blend tests RAM. The only problem I have encountered is with Turbo Boost.
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06-21-2012, 01:28 PM,
#4
RE: How to Overclock
Thank you for this, ricky07652!
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570k Ivy Bridge CPU cooler: NZXT Havik 140 Mobo: Biostar TZ77XE3 LGA 1155 Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Full Tower RAM: 8GB (2x4GB) Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB SSD PSU: Rosewill Capstone Series 650W 80+ Gold Audio: Asus Xonar DG 5.1 sound card Screen: Asus VH238H 23" 1080p HDMI LED monitor Keyboard: CM Storm Quick Fire Rapid Cherry MX Brown
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06-21-2012, 02:15 PM,
#5
RE: How to Overclock
Nice guide, stickied.
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12-21-2012, 05:09 PM,
#6
RE: How to Overclock
I have a few questions regarding overclocking. I just built my computer with a Biostar TZ77XE3 mobo and have an Intel i7 3770K cpu. I understand the ivy bridge architecture is more sensitive to voltages and temperatures than the sandy bridge. When I overclock, should I just increase the multiplier/FSB combination until I reach either 1.35V or a cpu temperature of about 80 degrees C, whichever comes first? Should I ever manually adjust the voltage at all? My cpu temperature with stock settings is about 30 degrees. Also, when overclocking, is it preferable to use software such as Toverclocker or do it manually in BIOS?
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12-22-2012, 08:31 AM,
#7
RE: How to Overclock
(12-21-2012, 05:09 PM)brlatiger Wrote: I have a few questions regarding overclocking. I just built my computer with a Biostar TZ77XE3 mobo and have an Intel i7 3770K cpu. I understand the ivy bridge architecture is more sensitive to voltages and temperatures than the sandy bridge. When I overclock, should I just increase the multiplier/FSB combination until I reach either 1.35V or a cpu temperature of about 80 degrees C, whichever comes first? Should I ever manually adjust the voltage at all? My cpu temperature with stock settings is about 30 degrees. Also, when overclocking, is it preferable to use software such as Toverclocker or do it manually in BIOS?

Don't increase the FSB. Only increase the multiplier. Increase the multiplier one at a time. Run Prime95 to check if it is stable for 12-24 hours. If it is not, increase the voltage. Then check the stability. Increase the multiplier again until you reach 1.35v, or 80 degrees C. Overclock in the BIOS.
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