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SSD + regular HD
02-01-2012, 08:09 AM,
#1
SSD + regular HD
Is there an article explaining how to put Windows and large programs on am SSD and have the other hard drive be the default for everything else?

As in, which would be the C drive and which would be D? Would the documents folder automatically go to the drive Windows is on and need to be manually moved? Can I make the default drive for saving things go to the regular HD, not the one I'm booting from?
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02-01-2012, 11:56 AM,
#2
RE: SSD + regular HD
When you go to install windows, only leave the SSD plugged in. You will install windows on the SSD and that will be your C drive. Then plug in the HDD. When you go to install other programs you will need to manually switch the location to the letter drive of the HDD.

This was weird for me when I first started. Because everything defaults to installing on the C drive. Eventually my computer learned and would default to the other drive.
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 CPU: Intel Core i7 2600K OC to 4.5Ghz CPU Cooler: Thermalright Silver Arrow CPU TIM: Thermalright Chill Factor III GPU: GeForce GTX 560 Ti Zotac AMP! SSD: Crucial M4 128GB HDD: Samsung F3 1TB Motherboard: ASRock P67 Extreme 4 Gen 3 RAM: 2x4GB (8GB) Corsair Low Profile 1600MHz Optical Drive: ASUS 24X PSU: 650W Seasonic 80+ Gold Sound Card: None (Integrated) Keyboard: i-rocks KR-6260 Gaming Mouse: Logitch Gaming G500 Monitor: Viewsonic 24" LED-vx2453
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02-01-2012, 08:10 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-01-2012, 08:11 PM by mwhals.)
#3
RE: SSD + regular HD
You can install windows on the SSD as already mentioned. Any programs you install will default to drive C (the SSD), so you can install the large ones there or select drive D (the HD) to install them.

I have my "My Documents" folder located on my D drive. You have to manually make the change. My "Favorites" folder is also on my D drive.
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 CPU: Intel Core i7 3930K CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 GPU: EVGA GTX 650 2GB SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB HDDs: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB and Western Digital VelociRaptor 500 GB Motherboard: Asus P9X79 Pro RAM: 8x8GB (64GB) G. Skill Ripjaws Z 1600MHz Optical Drives: two Asus DRWB1ST PSU: Seasonic X650 80+ Gold Keyboard: Das Keyboard Professional S Mouse: Logitech Performance MX Tablet: Logitech T650 Monitors: NEC P241W and NEC PA241W Speakers: Bose Companion 3 Operating System: Windows 8 Pro 64 bit
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02-01-2012, 09:00 PM,
#4
RE: SSD + regular HD
There is also another method if you want windows to think your stuff is on your C when its really located on your D drive. I use this method to install Steam games on my SSD and my HDD. You can set it up using whats known as a junction. Ill explain more if you're interested.
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02-02-2012, 06:25 AM,
#5
RE: SSD + regular HD
Well I've been looking into it and realize that at tier 4 the SSD + HDD cost 135 + 85, for $220 total. For $265 there's a 240 GB SSD. So for $45 more I think I could put everything on just a 240 GB SSD. My current PC is 7 years old and I only use 150 gigs and the only thing that would take more space is Win 7 vs. Win XP.

So would it be easier and give me a faster PC overall to use just a SSD for now and add a hard drive later is storage becomes an issue?
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02-02-2012, 11:04 AM,
#6
RE: SSD + regular HD
The HDD is not only for media storage. It's also a backup for your SSD. While SSDs are great for performance, they do fail more often than HDDs.

Unless you expect to have more than 120GB in operating system + applications, then it's worth the security to go SSD + HDD.

You mentioned that your current hard drive only has 150GB of data. How much of that is stuff like music or video files? Those are no brainers to push to the HDD and free up space on the SSD for applications which will actually see an improvement in speed.

Unless you're putting applications on your HDD, you won't see much difference in performance.
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02-02-2012, 01:12 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-02-2012, 01:12 PM by MathieuB.)
#7
RE: SSD + regular HD
(02-02-2012, 11:04 AM)Phyrre56 Wrote: While SSDs are great for performance, they do fail more often than HDDs.

I actually believe that SSDs are more reliable than HDDs. I say believe because I have no hard factual data to back up that claim though.

However, if I were to choose between a SSD that's considered reliable and a HDD that's considered reliable, based solely on reliability, I'd go with the SSD. It would not only be less likely to fail, but also a lot more resistant to shocks if used within a laptop.

That said, Kenat, you're currently looking at the OCZ Vertex Plus 240GB for $265, a poor choice in my opinion, because that particular SSD isn't reliable.

A Mushkin Enhanced Chronos 240GB will set you back $300, $35 more, but offers higher reliability and much higher performance: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6820226237

Alternatively, a Crucial M4 256GB will set you back $342 and offers even higher reliability, considered by many as the best when it comes to SSD reliability: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004W2JL2A/
Laptop: MSI GS30 Shadow-045 Dimensions: 12.6" x 8.9" x 0.8" 2.65lbs CPU: Intel Core i7-4870HQ Quad-Core + Hyper-Threading OC 2.5-3.9GHz RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz Video Card: Intel Iris Pro 5200 Storage: 2x128GB SDD RAID0 Audio: ASUS Xonar U3 USB Sound Card + Audio-Technica ATH-M50 headphones Screen: 13.3" - 1920 x 1080 IPS + 27" Dell P2715Q IPS 3840 x 2160 Keyboard: Filco Majestouch MX Cherry Blue Mouse: Logitech MX518
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02-02-2012, 08:54 PM,
#8
RE: SSD + regular HD
It used to be that SSDs were less reliable than HDs, but a lot has changed in the last couple of years. The better SSDs would be a better choice for reliabilty than a HD. Moving parts are a major disadvantage to a hard drive. Also, figure that RAM seems to fail less often than HDs. How often has flash memory in a USB drive failed? Not very often. Flash memory is much more robust than a spinning and panning head.
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 CPU: Intel Core i7 3930K CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 GPU: EVGA GTX 650 2GB SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB HDDs: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB and Western Digital VelociRaptor 500 GB Motherboard: Asus P9X79 Pro RAM: 8x8GB (64GB) G. Skill Ripjaws Z 1600MHz Optical Drives: two Asus DRWB1ST PSU: Seasonic X650 80+ Gold Keyboard: Das Keyboard Professional S Mouse: Logitech Performance MX Tablet: Logitech T650 Monitors: NEC P241W and NEC PA241W Speakers: Bose Companion 3 Operating System: Windows 8 Pro 64 bit
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02-02-2012, 09:04 PM,
#9
RE: SSD + regular HD
Ipods are a great example of that. I've lost count of many Ipods, equipped with hard drives, that I've fixed over the years, due to hard drive failure.
Laptop: MSI GS30 Shadow-045 Dimensions: 12.6" x 8.9" x 0.8" 2.65lbs CPU: Intel Core i7-4870HQ Quad-Core + Hyper-Threading OC 2.5-3.9GHz RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz Video Card: Intel Iris Pro 5200 Storage: 2x128GB SDD RAID0 Audio: ASUS Xonar U3 USB Sound Card + Audio-Technica ATH-M50 headphones Screen: 13.3" - 1920 x 1080 IPS + 27" Dell P2715Q IPS 3840 x 2160 Keyboard: Filco Majestouch MX Cherry Blue Mouse: Logitech MX518
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02-03-2012, 10:58 AM,
#10
RE: SSD + regular HD
I've learned a lot from this discussion! I still thought SSDs were less reliable. I stand corrected.

So really the decision is:

Option A: Sink all of your budget into one SSD. You can get a large drive with plenty of space for applications (240GB or so), or save some money and just get like a 120GB and no hard drive if you're lean on the application data anyway. Ideal for people that don't have a lot of space-hogging media (music, movies, etc).

Option B: Split your budget between SSD and HDD. You get a smaller, maybe not so fast SSD to hold your applications, and a very large (comparatively) HDD for media and other storage. You also gain the ability to back up your SSD to your HDD for security purposes.

Mathieu, I'm curious if there's a hard drive you would recommend that would ONLY be used as a backup. I imagine speed would not be terribly important, and it would never need to be larger than the SSD it was protecting. Is it worth trying to save money that way instead of getting a top of the line 7200rpm drive?
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