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tiers and their limiting factors
12-21-2011, 08:54 PM, (This post was last modified: 12-21-2011, 08:56 PM by devilmemnoch.)
#1
tiers and their limiting factors
i only have a passing knowledge for computer components, so when i am looking at the different tiers (esp between tier 7 and 8) and how they may be upgraded in the future a small but nagging question came to my mind.

if we are to build say a tier 7 or tier 8, thinking about how the requirements for games increase in say the next 5 years (i.e. cpu demands increases faster vs gpu or ram etc.),

what component would future games requirements "force" us to upgrade?

and based on your experiences, if we do upgrade, will it cause us to have components we havent upgraded act as bottlenecks?

thanks in advance for answers.
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12-22-2011, 04:04 AM,
#2
RE: tiers and their limiting factors
(12-21-2011, 08:54 PM)devilmemnoch Wrote: i only have a passing knowledge for computer components, so when i am looking at the different tiers (esp between tier 7 and 8) and how they may be upgraded in the future a small but nagging question came to my mind.

if we are to build say a tier 7 or tier 8, thinking about how the requirements for games increase in say the next 5 years (i.e. cpu demands increases faster vs gpu or ram etc.),

what component would future games requirements "force" us to upgrade?

and based on your experiences, if we do upgrade, will it cause us to have components we havent upgraded act as bottlenecks?

thanks in advance for answers.

5 years is a pretty long lifespan for a computer. Usually you will need to upgrade within that time frame if you want to stay even semi-current, and everything will be outdated by then. Just think back 5 years from now. 5 years ago just saw the release of the release of the Intel Core 2 Duos. Multicore processors had just seen their first release, and now we're up to 6-8 core processors. The advance of multiple cores blew away all the old single core chips, and 5 years from now I'm sure something else will come up. Workstations have a tendency to last a bit longer than gaming computers as the technology has a little more leniency, however it still doesn't have that long of a lifespan either. Gaming computers always need the newest top specs to be good, and in 3 years you're likely to need to replace your current one if you want to stay relevant with current games. No matter how much you attempt to future proof your system, with gaming, you'll always be a generation behind.
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12-22-2011, 06:38 AM,
#3
RE: tiers and their limiting factors
(12-21-2011, 08:54 PM)devilmemnoch Wrote: if we are to build say a tier 7 or tier 8, thinking about how the requirements for games increase in say the next 5 years (i.e. cpu demands increases faster vs gpu or ram etc.),

what component would future games requirements "force" us to upgrade?

and based on your experiences, if we do upgrade, will it cause us to have components we havent upgraded act as bottlenecks?

The video card would be what you would need to upgrade, if you intend to keep playing games at high resolution with max details.

The CPU and RAM could be upgraded as well, although it wouldn't be as necessary nor would have as much as an impact as upgrading the video card.

Usually other components aren't bottleneck, although I can't predict the future either.
Laptop: MSI GS30 Shadow-045 Dimensions: 12.6" x 8.9" x 0.8" 2.65lbs CPU: Intel Core i7-4870HQ Quad-Core + Hyper-Threading OC 2.5-3.9GHz RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz Video Card: Intel Iris Pro 5200 Storage: 2x128GB SDD RAID0 Audio: ASUS Xonar U3 USB Sound Card + Audio-Technica ATH-M50 headphones Screen: 13.3" - 1920 x 1080 IPS + 27" Dell P2715Q IPS 3840 x 2160 Keyboard: Filco Majestouch MX Cherry Blue Mouse: Logitech MX518
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12-22-2011, 06:19 PM,
#4
RE: tiers and their limiting factors
thanks
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