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anxious for workstation guide update
12-31-2011, 03:10 PM,
#11
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
My friend was telling me the difference between ECC RAM and non-ECC RAM. When you're running things like servers, you need the best reliability possible, so you need things like redundant power supplies and ECC RAM. The failure rate of RAM is very low, but the failure rate of ECC RAM is magnitudes lower.
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01-01-2012, 01:53 AM,
#12
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
(12-31-2011, 03:10 PM)Brian Wrote: My friend was telling me the difference between ECC RAM and non-ECC RAM. When you're running things like servers, you need the best reliability possible, so you need things like redundant power supplies and ECC RAM. The failure rate of RAM is very low, but the failure rate of ECC RAM is magnitudes lower.

I don't believe it's just the failure rate, I think it has to do with error detection and correction, as occasionally the wrong voltage signal is sent messing up the binary signal, and if that mistake isn't caught, it could cause a slight hiccup in the system, but ECC RAM will notice the mistakes and won't pass them on causing those hiccups, which for a server could be disasterous.
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01-02-2012, 10:13 AM,
#13
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
ya know until I can get my hands on a xeon cpu in town to check it out, I will just stick with a normal game rig setup for now and stay in familiar territory. Mainly I wanted a computer that could kick ass at rendering long periods of time but I don't really need to do that at this moment. I am still an enthusiast, not a pro working at home all day. I'm gonna put something together from the recent gaming builds.
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01-02-2012, 10:25 AM,
#14
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
(01-02-2012, 10:13 AM)muggsftw Wrote: ya know until I can get my hands on a xeon cpu in town to check it out, I will just stick with a normal game rig setup for now and stay in familiar territory. Mainly I wanted a computer that could kick ass at rendering long periods of time but I don't really need to do that at this moment. I am still an enthusiast, not a pro working at home all day. I'm gonna put something together from the recent gaming builds.

Let me reiterate, the Xeon's are useless, however the Nvidia Quadro GPUs will insanely decrease your rendering times. Work off of the recommended budget workstation build using the i7-2600 CPU with the highest Quadro card you can afford. I apologize if I may be starting to get harsh at this point, but you ask for advice then completely ignore every single person here. The Xeons are pointless, the Quadros are a great investment, that's the gist of everything.
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01-02-2012, 11:49 AM,
#15
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
When I say rendering I'm talking about using Mental Ray for Autodesk Maya to generate still images. GPU has little to no effect on rendering unless it's a GPU based renderer, which Mental Ray is not. A quadro will give me power (high polygon count) in the viewport and that's about it. I have not ignored every single person here, I'm taking it all into consideration, IT'S BEEN GOOD ADVICE. There is probably just some disagreement on the performance and reasoning behind the purchase of some of these computer parts. The xeons are not a useless proc, they are plenty of pros in town that use them and swear by them, however they usually buy a dell or mac pro.
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01-02-2012, 12:05 PM,
#16
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
(01-02-2012, 11:49 AM)muggsftw Wrote: When I say rendering I'm talking about using Mental Ray for Autodesk Maya to generate still images. GPU has little to no effect on rendering unless it's a GPU based renderer, which Mental Ray is not. A quadro will give me power (high polygon count) in the viewport and that's about it. I have not ignored every single person here, I'm taking it all into consideration, IT'S BEEN GOOD ADVICE. There is probably just some disagreement on the performance and reasoning behind the purchase of some of these computer parts. The xeons are not a useless proc, they are plenty of pros in town that use them and swear by them, however they usually buy a dell or mac pro.

Mental Ray is one of the few CPU based renderers, and you never mentioned that was what you were using, as Maya in general has huge advantages when using a Quadro card, yet with this specific application, you are right, the Quadro card well not be too beneficial, however the i7-3960k, having a hex core CPU will be greatly beneficial, and much cheaper than the Xeons. Yes, there are people who uae Xeons, yet the configurations that would take advantage of what Xeons are capable of will cost you closer to $4000, otherwise you will actually get a much lower performing computer. The best system you can get in your price range will be built around the i7-3960k for a CPU based renderer. The reason I said you've been ignoring everyone is that I don't believe a single person here said the Xeons are worth it, so it's not really a disagreement in responses, but rather a disagreement between what you believe, and what everyone else does.
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01-02-2012, 11:09 PM,
#17
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
(01-02-2012, 11:49 AM)muggsftw Wrote: however they usually buy a dell or mac pro.

People buying these have more money however. You check the price of a mac pro you are talking about. I've worked in the film industry and the money you can save by building your own rig is a lot.
You need to think of it this way. having an i7 is great but sometimes you only have the money for an i3.

The % increase for the price is the point.
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01-03-2012, 05:01 PM,
#18
RE: anxious for workstation guide update
(01-02-2012, 11:09 PM)carlstar Wrote:
(01-02-2012, 11:49 AM)muggsftw Wrote: however they usually buy a dell or mac pro.

People buying these have more money however. You check the price of a mac pro you are talking about. I've worked in the film industry and the money you can save by building your own rig is a lot.
You need to think of it this way. having an i7 is great but sometimes you only have the money for an i3.

The % increase for the price is the point.

With the Mac Pros, the first model with any advantage over any i7 starts at $3,500 before tax and shipping, and the stock build is pretty terrible, so try and get a better feel for it from that. You can get a pretty solid i7-3960k build for just about $2,500, but even for about $2,000, it's doable, but with the Xeons, the prices are so much higher for anything comparable, so to say you want the Xeons, yet you have a $2,000 budget just doesn't really work. You can try and make t work, but you'll just end up with a much worse machine in the process.
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