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Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
09-01-2013, 10:53 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-01-2013, 11:34 PM by VolkFrost.)
#1
Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Hi guys, just wanted to ask couple of questions regarding the compatibility of some of the parts that I'm going to buy and build!

OK, so currently what I'm planning to build is right here:

Motherboard
Gigabyte GA-Z87M-D3H Z87 6xSATA6.0Gbps 4xUSB3.0

CPU
Intel Core i5-4670K 3.4-3.8GHz Turbo Unlocked Multiplier 84W

Video Card
EVGA GeForce GTX 770 2GB SuperClocked

RAM
Corsair 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3 1600MHz CAS 10 1.5v

Storage
Samsung 840 2.5″ 250GB SATA III SSD
Seagate ST2000DM001 2 TB SATA III

Optical drives
LG SATA 24X DVD Burner

Cases
Looking for Corsair Obsidian 350D, but it seems in my home country [Indonesia] it's not that easy to find one. So I might browse through the options of Cooler Master, any suggestions?

Power Supply
Looking for alternatives for the Rosewill 600-700W

Cooling
Noctua NH-U14S OR the Noctua NH-D14
Casefans depending on the case I'll get

Sound
Asus Xonar DGX or DX

Now onto my questions

1. On how to actually Overclock, in my case the processor that I'm going to use is the 1150 socket, so is the process of the overclock is still similar with the 1155?

I'm currently looking at this thread: http://forums.hardware-revolution.com/sh...p?tid=3159

2. About the Video card, does the different manufacturer (EVGA, ASUS, MSI, Digital Alliance, Gigabyte) matters that much?
Because the ones I've found on the market here is (with the GTX 770) are only Gigabyte and Digital Alliance

3. About the RAM, it seems I've found so many different types of RAM (Dual-Channel Quad-channel) is there a simple explanation for a total noobs in this?

4. About the SSD, so should I put my C:// drive into the SSD and put all the downloads, documents stuff on the HDD? or should I make a partition for the SSD or something like that? because if I put all my games inside the SSD I don't think it would fit all inside.


It seems these are the only questions I have in mind at the moment.
I hope you guys could help me out!

Thanks so much in advance!
Reply
09-01-2013, 11:35 PM,
#2
Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
For a power supply, look at the Seasonic X series as they are good and reliable. Also make sure your ram is low profile for the large heat sinks. Corsair also makes good power supplies.

Regarding cases, they are a personal decision. I personally like the Fractal Designs Define 4 case, which is roomy enough for the largest coolers.

On to your other questions:

1. Over clocking with socket 1150 works the same as with socket 1155 or 2011.

2. A GTX 770 will be the same chipset with any manufacturer. The differences between them are probably negligible for the same clock speed. The differences will be that some may be over locked and others not. Some will have different fan configurations. The Gigabyte card would be a good choice.

3. Dual channel ram means that the ram is matched in pairs and quad channel ram is matched in fours. Matched means they are from the same batch for better compatibility. The socket 1150 and 1155 CPUs use dual channel ram. Socket 2011 uses quad channel ram. As a result, you just need dual channel ram. If you plan on putting two modules in each of the two banks, you could get quad channel ram. The ram is the same for single, dual or quad channel. As I mentioned before, the terminology just means they are from the same batch. Other than that, there is nothing special about dual or quad channel ram.
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 CPU: Intel Core i7 3930K CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 GPU: EVGA GTX 650 2GB SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB HDDs: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB and Western Digital VelociRaptor 500 GB Motherboard: Asus P9X79 Pro RAM: 8x8GB (64GB) G. Skill Ripjaws Z 1600MHz Optical Drives: two Asus DRWB1ST PSU: Seasonic X650 80+ Gold Keyboard: Das Keyboard Professional S Mouse: Logitech Performance MX Tablet: Logitech T650 Monitors: NEC P241W and NEC PA241W Speakers: Bose Companion 3 Operating System: Windows 8 Pro 64 bit
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09-02-2013, 12:00 AM,
#3
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Ok, so the low profile ram means that the ram sticks are supposed to be smaller in size than the standard ones right?

Cases, there's so much options! but I've found that some cases have only 2 case fans and some has 4 case fans. What's the recommended total number of case fans? the sizes I've found are usually 120mm and 140mm.

1. Okay then so Overclocking seems simple enough, but is overclocking really worth it? I mean I've heard stories that overclocking could cut up your lifetime of your CPU up to 2 years of everyday usage. I'm worried that overclocking might damage the CPU really fast.

2. Ah thanks for the info then! I'll definitely look on the Gigabyte card!

3. Wow thanks for the really simple explanations! It really helped me

Thanks for the answers!
Reply
09-02-2013, 02:58 AM,
#4
Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
I have two 140 mm front fans and one rear 140 mm exhaust fan. They keep my system cool. My case came with one front fan and I added a second.

Regarding over clocking, if you keep your CPU temperature in check you will find it obsolete long before it would fail.

Low profile ram just means that it isn't as tall as normal ram. G. Skill Ripjaw X ram is good ram that will fit under the large Noctua cooler. I know, because I have both.
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 CPU: Intel Core i7 3930K CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 GPU: EVGA GTX 650 2GB SSD: Samsung 840 Pro 256GB HDDs: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB and Western Digital VelociRaptor 500 GB Motherboard: Asus P9X79 Pro RAM: 8x8GB (64GB) G. Skill Ripjaws Z 1600MHz Optical Drives: two Asus DRWB1ST PSU: Seasonic X650 80+ Gold Keyboard: Das Keyboard Professional S Mouse: Logitech Performance MX Tablet: Logitech T650 Monitors: NEC P241W and NEC PA241W Speakers: Bose Companion 3 Operating System: Windows 8 Pro 64 bit
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09-03-2013, 10:53 AM,
#5
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Almost any case from Corsair or Antec in your price range is a pretty good deal. I wouldn't just look at how many fans are included, as you can easily add more (better) fans yourself. Instead, also look at build quality, air filters, and cable routing options, as being able to keep cables tidy (or behind the motherboard) will help airflow as much as having good fans. I believe the articles recommend a few good Cooler Master cases. Just be aware, that some of those open-air, HAF cases are dust-magnets.

As far as Overclocking -- My previous PC had a AMD Athlon X2 3800+, which was overclocked about 30%, for 7 years, and still works fine to this day.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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09-05-2013, 04:27 AM, (This post was last modified: 09-05-2013, 05:22 AM by VolkFrost.)
#6
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Today I'm going to the computer plaza to look for the cases options. So far the one's popular is the Corsair series and Cooler Master series.

What's the recommendation of a 'good' case? closed air and have a nice cable management? or is there something else? (I'm looking at Micro-ATX cases)

Ok, it seems overclocking safe enough. How much should the CPU overclocked? I mean, whats the recommended or optimal increase in Ghz? Is 30% a high increase? or I could just boost up to 50% increase?

And about the storage system.. It seems in my country SSD are still a luxurious item as their price are almost twice the price listed on this website and the newegg. So I think I'll use only HDD this time.
Should I buy 2 1TB HDD or just one 2TB HDD and partition the disk?

So far, I still do not understand behind the RAID system. I've read some RAID articles in here and on the internet, but it seems I still have no idea on how they work.
So, if I have 2 HDD (each with 1TB for example) then I'm using the RAID 1, so does the computer recognize the C: as a 2TB? or only 1TB with the other 1 as a hidden disk? What about using the RAID 0?

And one last question, if for instance my hard disk were to fail and it uses RAID 1, how do I back up with the RAID system? Do I have to use another computer to access the hard disk? Or do I have to go to BIOS and there's an option to back up the data?
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09-10-2013, 08:15 PM,
#7
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Is anyone still here?
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09-12-2013, 01:46 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-12-2013, 01:56 PM by Rapajez.)
#8
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
I'll try to provide some answers in-line:

Quote:What's the recommendation of a 'good' case? closed air and have a nice cable management? or is there something else? (I'm looking at Micro-ATX cases)

Closed air means less dust, less noise, and more control of the airflow. Cable managment is nice, as it lets you hide and route cables to keep them out of the way of the airflow, and make work in the case less of a hassle.

Here's an example of how I used it in my build:

[Image: F4rNJEk.jpg]

Quote:Ok, it seems overclocking safe enough. How much should the CPU overclocked? I mean, whats the recommended or optimal increase in Ghz? Is 30% a high increase? or I could just boost up to 50% increase?

Not a simple answer. It can depends on the motherboard quality, power supply quality, and of course, the cooling. Because of tiny differences during manufacturing, even 2 identical systems may OC differently. You basically have to slowly push the chip further and further, until stuff starts acting up. The short answer though, is that 30% is average on the latest Intel generations, with decent quality equipment and cooling. Again, you results will very. I haven't researched the new "Haswell" overclocking, as they added some new features. Just do a quick Google search for "Haswell Overclocking for Beginners".

Quote:And about the storage system.. It seems in my country SSD are still a luxurious item as their price are almost twice the price listed on this website and the newegg. So I think I'll use only HDD this time.
Should I buy 2 1TB HDD or just one 2TB HDD and partition the disk?

I'd buy one 2TB HDD, and don't worry about partitioning. You could get 2 in a RAID 0 or RAID 1, but I don't think the added headache is worth the performance improvement. You may want to look at the recommended drives in the latest articles, as some of the larger 3-4 TB drives are actually faster. Basically, everything's packed together tighter, so there's less moving needed.

Quote:So far, I still do not understand behind the RAID system. I've read some RAID articles in here and on the internet, but it seems I still have no idea on how they work.
So, if I have 2 HDD (each with 1TB for example) then I'm using the RAID 1, so does the computer recognize the C: as a 2TB? or only 1TB with the other 1 as a hidden disk? What about using the RAID 0?

With RAID 1, the 2 disks are mirrored, and the system would just see the RAID as a single 1TB drive. The idea is redundancy. If one drive fails, the system uses the 2nd drive, and continues on without interruption. You then just replace the failed drive, when you get around to it. Usually, your motherboard will come with a utility that monitors the state of your RAID arrays.

If you don't care about redundancy, and want more performance and capacity, a RAID 0 array would show up as one 2TB drive. It is roughly twice as fast as one single drive, as the system splits all the tasks between the two drives. However, one drive failure could take out everything, so you'd just want to make sure you keep backups of your important stuff on another disk or computer.

Again, you probably want to just avoid RAID for now, get a big drive, and then pick up a SSD when the prices drop for you. No matter what you have, set up a backup solution ASAP.

Quote:And one last question, if for instance my hard disk were to fail and it uses RAID 1, how do I back up with the RAID system? Do I have to use another computer to access the hard disk? Or do I have to go to BIOS and there's an option to back up the data?

With RAID 1, if one drive fails, the system still is fully operational. If they both fail simultaneously, (unlikely), then you'd have to use recovery tools or just restore your backups to get your data back. If you just want to protect a small collection of music, pictures, and documents, it may be as simple as syncing to Dropbox. If you want a full system image backup (a snapshot of your entire hard drive, including the operating system, programs, files, and settings), you can purchase software or use the Built-in Windows 7 features to say, backup to an external USB drive.

Either way, check out the latest "Best Drives for your Money" article, for a beginners guide to RAIDs. There's also an excellent article for choosing a Backup Solution.
GPU: NVIDIA Titan X, CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz OC'd @ 4.5GHz, Mobo: ASRock Z77 Extreme4, Mem: 2x Corsair Dominator 2133MHz 8GB, SSD: Samsung 850 EVO, Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, PSU: Corsair TX850M, CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14, Case Fans: 4x Cooler Master Excalibur 120mm PWM, Monitors: 3x ViewSonic VX2270SMH-LED in NVIDIA Surround
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09-12-2013, 04:13 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-12-2013, 05:02 PM by PwnBroker.)
#9
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
what rapajez said about the cases, and i will add one: if you are looking at micro-atx cases that might limit your cpu cooler options.

overclocking-it depends a whole lot on which batch number chip you get. it seems that overclocking quality is all over the map with haswell. even so they are wicked fast at stock speed. even the worst binned chips are getting at least 4.2 gig.

what rapajez said about raid configs. if you owned a small business then raid 1 would fit well to keep sales, receipts, etc. raid 0- with 2 disks, it doubles your chances of drive failure. with 3 disks, it triples, etc. it might run forever in raid 0, its a gamble.

as for raid backups and images, you will need software that supports dynamic/raid disks and also support bootable images and if you use a usb drive as a backup make sure the software supports boot from a usb drive.

me personally, before ssd's, i liked partitioned 1 tb drives with c: drive being the first 25% of the drive. it keeps c: on the fastest part of the drive and no worries of slowing down as the drive fills. then for something like e: for the next partition for all of the other stuff like, pics, music etc. it makes it easier to do images as well and easier to transfer to an ssd when you get one. also keeps your files a little more manageable. if you go that route and want to make backups/images you will need another drive for that.(always put a backup/image on a seperate drive).

good luck
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09-13-2013, 10:10 AM,
#10
RE: Questions about compatibility, video cards, etc. [First time builder here!]
Ok guys thank you for all the help! I really appreciate it.
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